Friday, August 29, 2014 at 4pm

The 100% Experiential Learning MBA & Other MBA News Snippets

100% experiential learning MBA in Australia

AMBA: Recruiters keen on MBA specializations but need convincing of online

An MBA recruiters’ forum held by accreditation body, AMBA, dealt a blow to the online MBA when employers expressed a reluctance to consider the format’s graduates to be on a par with those of traditional on-campus programs.

The event, held at Imperial College Business School, was attended by representatives from 24 multinational MBA recruiters including KPMG, Goldman Sachs, Bloomberg and BP as well as those from 22 AMBA-accredited business schools.

MBA specializations were also a hot topic, with MBA recruiters expressing their desire for graduates with industry-specific skillsets. The rise of MBA specializations tailored to an industry is a continuing trend among leading business schools as they work to meet demand from MBA recruiters.

However, Imperial College Business School dean, Professor G. Anandalingham, emphasized that an MBA is “the premium, flagship program – hence schools should partner with corporates to produce the kind of graduate they are looking for,” according to a press release for AMBA.

These graduates should also be rich in ‘soft skills’ according to the MBA recruiters in attendance at the forum – reinforcing the findings of 2013/14 QS Jobs & Salary Trends Report.

Healthcare management at Queen’s School of Business

One industry that looks set to be in need of more skilled leaders is the healthcare sector, and this has led to the introduction of healthcare management MBA specializations, such as that found at Canada’s Queen’s School of Business.

“I know healthcare is a rapidly growing and dynamic field and I feel that with this, I can make an impact,” Josephine Gee, who will graduate from the school’s first healthcare management stream, told the Financial Post.

The program at Queen’s School of Business combines MBA fundamentals with industry-specific electives borrowed from the public administration department at Queen’s University, as well as providing opportunities to gain direct experience with healthcare providers. 

Shai Dubey, director of Queen’s School of Business MBA program spoke of the possibilities for graduates in healthcare management, particularly for those working in countries with an ageing demographic: “It’s a growing field with all kinds of opportunities from finance and consulting to strategy and supply chain.”

Along with pharmaceuticals, the healthcare management sector came out top in a recent GMAC comparison of the ROI in early job offers received by MBA graduates, as can be seen in this table.

Experiential learning to the max at the University of Canberra

Experiential learning has long been considered an integral aspect of leading MBA programs – with the benefits of putting newly-acquired skills to use in a hands-on environment there for all to see.

However, the University of Canberra aims to take the importance of experiential learning that one step further – by proposing a new MBA program that removes coursework and is 100% experiential learning.

The University of Canberra’s idea is backed by Australia’s Liberman family and, over the course of one year, intends to place students within some of the country’s largest companies to work on three real-life projects, each consisting of four months.

Recent reaction focused on how entry and assessment criteria will be met by the University of Canberra – with a suggestion that the program would run the risk of being considered an apprenticeship rather than an academic qualification.

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Tim is a writer with a background in consumer journalism and charity communications. He trained as a journalist in the UK and holds degrees in history (BA) and Latin American studies (MA).

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